ANIRVAN, SCHOLAR SAINT

ANIRVAN AKASH - Sky Enlightenment Of Inner Yoga - Live Within

 


GITANUVACHAN
By Sri Anirvan
translated by Smt Kalyani Bose. Copyright.

A Few Words by Smt Kalyani Bose

Rabindranath Tagore had said in his famous poem “Sadhana,” something like ~ ’my abilities could not match my wishful thinking.’
(Knowing how difficult it is to translate a poem and that too from a poet of such colossus stature as Rabindranath, and my limited knowledge and ability, I am sure I shall be excused for the of poor translation of his famous line,’ Jato sadh chhilo, sadhya chhilo na’)
But that is exactly what I feel, whenever I try to translate anything written by Sri Anirvan. Fortunately, the most applicable comment has been supplied in the Introduction of the very edition in Bengali from which I have translated. A few lines from there:
This unique commentary of Gita is possible only from the pen of Sri Anirvan. Gita is the Vani sprouting from the speech of Purushottama Sri Krishna and Gitanuvachan is the commentary of Gita coming out of the pen of Purushottama Sri Anirvan.
‘Gitanuvachan’ is a series of Questions by Swami Satyananda and answers by Srimad Anirvan.
It is divided into three parts containing the Q/A on three different Shatakas.

GITANUVACHAN

PART I


Question:
In the hymn of meditation, the Gita has been addressed as ‘Amba’ (Mother). What is the inner meaning? Why has the Gita been compared to a
Mother?

Answer:
The Gita has been classified with the Upanishads. All Upanishads are part of Shruti. Shruti is the same as Goddess Vak as well as Saraswati. The Veda has addressed Goddess Saraswati as the Highest Mother (Ambitame), and has given an exquisite description of Her Maternal Form. With all these associations, Shruti is termed as Mother and so Gita is also Amba or Mother.

Question:
What should be the real term? Srimad Bhagavatgito or Srimad Bhagavatgita? If it is the ’Divine Song of the Lord’ it should be ’Gito’ (Sung). Whatever is sung with a tune is ’Git’ (Song), is not it? Then like the Sams of Samveda, is Gita also to be sung? …Why does Gita have such adjectives at the end of each chapter as Upanishad, Knowledge of Brahman and Yogashashtra?

Answer:
The name is ‘Srimad Bhagavatgita- an adjective to Upanishad. It is not plausible that the Lord was delivering the advice singing. Most probably He spoke in regular prose. The lyrical form was given when it was arranged the way we see it now. Gita is basically a scripture of Devotion. It can be proved even from the Vedas that the devotees used to worship their Lord by singing. Even in Gita, there is a mention of continuous chanting ( Ch. IX, Sl.14). The instructions of the Lord, after being arranged, probably got the form of a ballad, which was sung at that time. It was the devotees who used to sing. Gradually, an idea emerged that the slokas were sung by the Lord.
It is an old tradition to compose the spiritual instructions in form of a verse, and this practice continued right up to the middle ages. Hence it is neither surprising nor impossible that the Lord CAN deliver instructions in form of verse, but it is hard to visualize that Krishna and Arjuna were conversing in poetry in the disastrous battlefield of Kurukshetra.
Actually Gita is a part of History. Both Ramayana and Mahabharata are known as History. Itihasa (History) and Puranas together are considered as the Fifth Veda. Hence there should be no restrictions to consider some specific part of the Fifth Veda as Upanishad. In those days, a large part of the general mass followed the path of Devotion. To them the verbal words of Vasudeva is verily Veda, therefore Upanishad. And all Upanishads expound the study of Brahman. Therefore Gita is also a study of Brahman. Gita has not only given advice of the Reality, but has also given instructions of how to manifest that Reality in life by sadhana. Each and every system of sadhana is Yoga~ Gita expounds an idea like that. Hence each and every chapter of the Gita is a ‘Yoga.’ As a result, Gita is a scripture of Knowledge as well as of Yoga.

Question:
During the great battle of Kurukshetra, Sri Krishna advised Gita to Arjuna before the war started. The need was to inspire Arjuna to rise up to his natural Dharma and to fight against the Asuric forces of the Kauravas. Is it not so? Were the Eighteen Chapters delivered holding off the battle? The background of Gita was the great Battle, is it not so? According to many the great battle is not historical and there are many who put importance on Gita only as a spiritual exposition. What are the hidden mysteries?

Answer:
I do not see any valid reason for promoting the opinion that the battle of Kurukshetra was not historical. It is true that ’India did not produce a Herodotus or a Thucydides. Therefore everything about her past is nothing but imagination- even the Western Scholars do not hold this opinion any more.
Sri Krishna is an historical figure; the time of the great battle has been identified in Mahabharata itself and lot of research has been carried on to identify the exact date. Perhaps this battle took place around 1400 B.C.
For those who want to bring down the Vedic Era, with some selfish motivation, might have some disadvantage with this timing, but their denial is gradually getting feebler and feebler.
The illusion of Arjuna and the removal of that illusion by Sri Krishna- are natural incidents. It is hard to say if Gita, as we find today, has been in the same form from the very beginning. That is why Mr. Otto is searching for the ‘Original Gita’.
That the message of Gita is original, even if the language is not, can be proved with references from Chandogya Upanishad. To accept the whole life as Yagna and to be Desireless- these two are the basic principles of Gita. The way work, Knowledge and Devotion have been synthesized in Gita is unique in the spiritual history of India. This could not have happened without the influence of a Great and Unique Personality. It can be observed too that in depicting the Personality of Sri Krishna, the Itihasa and Puranas have everywhere followed a single basic structure of philosophy of life. So much cohesion can not be accidental. Therefore, there is can be no objection in the veracity of Sri Krishna and His dictum.
The Gita was delivered before the onset of the war; there is no question of stopping the battle there. There is nothing surprising in the fact that a great soul will bring back to senses a like minded relative with the help of a couple of hours’ advice.
In addition, please note that there was a marked characteristic in writing History of this country. If there were any events in a human life that was an expression of Universal Truth, then the life and experience of that man was included as part of history. Elsewhere there was hardly anything other than the list of names according to the Genealogical table. This way Itihasa and Purana used to acquire the dignity of the Vedas by being carriers of mass education. I think the success of writing history lies in the art of presenting it as a guide to ideal life.
Gradually, events become just a pretext, expression of reality becomes the theme. The philosophers want to avoid that saying that the ’narration is the real meaning.’ But that is wrong. The blazing Truth expresses itself through human life. On one side there is an event on the other a truth. The presentation of the Itihasa and Purana becomes successful when there is a balance between the two. And human life then exemplifies the Proposed Truth.

Question:
In the mantra for meditation, Gita has been referred to as ‘showering the nectar of Eternal Adwaitabad’. What is the hidden meaning?

Answer:
In the introduction, the body and the conclusion of Gita, everywhere is the presentation of the Doctrine of Non-Dualism. At the very onset, Arjuna is faced with a very-well known problem-how to accept and adjust with the departure on near and dear ones? Sri Krishna solved the problem with the doctrine of Non-Dualism, saying, ‘Know Him to be Eternal by whom all is pervaded.’ Life and death are like bubbles rising and falling in the ocean of Consciousness. The bubbles die down but the ocean remains the same. If you can remain with the consciousness of ocean, death can not cause grief or distress.
From this we get the idea of ever lasting Self. In the middle, where He is introducing Himself, there too Sri Krishna expresses Himself as an All Pervading Supreme Reality- as Unmaifest Brahman- as Time- as Purusha manifested in myriads of Divine qualities- the Adorable Beloved Lord of our beings.
Furthermore, He added, no matter in whatever way one worships, it is the worship of that One and Only One. Here we get a hint of Monotheism.

He makes it very clear in the Eighteenth Chapter (conclusion). ’All instincts of life originate from the One Who is All Pervading. By worshipping Him with one’s designated work, man attains salvation.’ Again we are getting the application of Adwaita in life itself. The whole life is His worship (or Yagna whatever you call it). He is All Pervading; from Him bursts forth the joy of life.
This way at the beginning, in the middle and at the end, the Gita has given instructions of the same doctrine of Non-Dualism in the form of All Pervading Reality.
Clouds send forth showers. This Dark Cloud is also sending us showers- showers of the Nectar of Immortality. The Cloud is Dark because He is Beyond the effulgence of the white rays of the Sun~ He is that Supreme Blue Black in Whose unfathomable depth life and death both get lost. The showers of Immortality from this Cloud brings healing balm to the life scorched by the blazing flame of the three Gunas- and barren life begets lush foliage.
Patanjali has termed the ‘Perfect Yoga’ as the Cloud of Dharma, meaning that the one stationed in that Yoga is always being bathed by the shower of Dharma, which is beyond the mundane world. The same idea is echoed here too.

All the above excerpts (other than the first one) are from an upcoming book by Sri Anirvan, translated by Kalyani Bose and published by Morning Light Press. morninglight press.com

Question:
What is the purport of the arrangement of Chapters from the Vishad to the Moksha Yoga?

Answer:
In the Gita, Sri Krishna is gradually revealing Himself in the consciousness of Arjuna. That is why it is wise to keep the context in mind while discussing Gita.
In Vishad Yoga, the manifested self ( Jiva) is desirous of knowledge. He is facing the greatest problem in life- the mystery of death. The question, how to overcome death has dramatically appeared.
In the Second Chapter we get the full answer to that from the philosophical aspect of Self. Both dissolution in Brahman (Brahma Nirvana) and existence in Brahman (Brahmisthiti) have been expounded here. This is the core chapter of the Gita. The other chapters are expansion of the same thought.
The Third Chapter gives the clues of Karma Yoga as conclusion to the Second Chapter.
The Fourth Chapter synthesizes Work and Knowledge. Incidentally the theory of Avtarhood has been mentioned. This is important. whatever has been given as hint, will be expressed in details in the Ninth Chapter.
The Fifth chapter gives the hint that Karma Yoga and Jnana Yoga eventually culminate in Bhakti or Devotion.
The Sixth Chapter gives practical instructions on Yoga.
This far is the First Shatka. Its main subject is Self Knowledge, because one can not become Brahman without knowing oneself. Sri Krishna has said very little about Brahman or of Gor so far. The main point is Samkhya or the Yoga of Knowledge- that too not without Work. One may achieve success by following this path only. So answers to Arjuna's quest might have ended here.
But it did not. Without being asked any question, out of His pwn Grace, He is about to shower the Knowledge about Himself in the Totality in the Seventh Chapter. To Know Him after knowing the Self~ Sadhana is going deeper. To know oneself is Jnana, to know Him is Vijnana. Seventh Chapter is the introduction to that.
To know Him one has to know the mystery of the universe. There are seven great mysteries. The Eighth Chapter deals with them. Particularly one has to know the mystery of Death and that has been discussed well in here. This has to be noted that death is not extinction of a lamp~ it is dissolution in Him.
The Ninth Chapter is the most important one. Once I know all the mysteries of life and death, and of the universe, I wll know who is the One in Form. What is the True Self of this incarnation in 'Human Form.' That Knowledge is the Highest Vijnana. He reveals Himself by bringing to light the Highest Secret (Raja Guhya) in Arjuna's consciousness. We have to understand that after this, each and every word of the Gita is a grand revelation by the Lord Incarnate.
To make that undestanding more vivd is the Bibhuti Yoga of the tenth Chapter. The hint is to see Him manifested everywhere. The concrete realisation of that is in the vision of Universal Form in the Eleventh Chapter. But of course Arjuna saw the Universal Form as Time the Destroyer in the context of Kurukshetra. Vrindavan is understood here.
True Devotion is possible only by observing the Universe in Him and by realizing the Highest in a human form. This Devotion comes from the fullness of Self Knowledge. The Second Shatka is complete with the Twelfth Chapter. With that comes the completion of knowing oneself as well as knowing the Supreme Self.
Here too, is the end of all questions. But His Grace is again showering the Universal Knowledge, and again even without being asked. Remember, though, that the basis of this Knowledge is the Universal Vision. The Sadhaka is established in Cosmic Consciousness. From that level he is seeing Prakriti and Purusha, the Three Gunas, the Three Sraddhas, the play of the Devas and Asuras, the diversities of the Universe (Chapter Eighteen) and all other. The Central point of all that is the Reality of Purushottama (Chapter Fifteen).
By and large, this is the meaning of the arrangement of the Chapters in the Gita.

Question:
There are three shatka (group of six) in the Gita, Work, Devotion and Knowledge. Many say that Gita is the scripture of Bhakti, some say of Knowledge and others say of Work. Is not Gita a synthesis of different ways? Where is the beginning and where is the end of Gita, in Knowledge, Devotion or Work?

Answer:
Verily, Gita is the scripture of synthesis and from this aspect Gita has no equal among spiritual scriptures. It is a matter of abject sorrow that even in three thousand years we could not apply the teachings of Gita in our practical life. The whole life is a Yagna or a Yoga- that is the ultimate announcement of Gita. Even from the ancient times, Yagna was termed as Karma, meaning whatever one does, should have a sense of sacrifice or offering towards the gods. And that is both real Work as well as Yagna. According to the language of the Gita, where there is no sense of sacrifice, no presence of divinity, no sign of upliftment of human consciousness, there work is nothing but misguided actions.
A doctrine like Renunciation of all Action and the ensuing result of Knowledge was very much prevalent during the time of Gita. Sri Krishna did not pay any heed to that. Again He has openly attacked the ceremonial rituals aiming at the worldly enjoyment and wealth in the name of Yagna. According to Him performing all work with a firm footing in Yoga is the basic aim and leads to the eventual perfection of life.
Life starts with work. The teachings of Gita also starts at Kurukshetra (Field of Work) at the onset of a dire activity. Work has to be performed according to whatever has been allotted to each one of us. But work is to be done without any expectation of results and with equality to success and failure. Knowledge will emerge from this It will be clear that whatever is to happen is happening due to the determinism of Nature. There is no way to avoid that nor is there any point in being involved in that. Once this discernment dawns, mind becomes peaceful, it gets easier to enjoy without attachment or aversion and work with detachment and a feeling of non- doership.

This way knowledge comes after work. With knowledge consciousness expands. We understand that it is the Divine Guidance that is at the root of all natural motivation of work and eventually consider ourselves as Divine instruments. He is the Player and I am His Flute- this feeling is very conducive to the ultimate Devotion. Like this all work culminate from action to knowledge and ultimately attainment of perfection comes from doing all work with devotion and a sense of offering. This is the Living Philosophy of the Gita.

This particular excerpt is from an upcoming book by Sri Anirvan, translated by Kalyani Bose and published by Morning Light Press. morninglight press.com

Question:

What is the implication of the word ‘Karpanyadosho’ in the Seventh Sloka of Chapter Two of Gita? Hasn’t the word ‘Kripana‘ used in the Upanishad to identify those who leave the world without self realization? Why the word ’Prapanna’ being used even after ’Sishya’? Is it natural with human beings to go through the confusion about Dharma that Arjuna went through? Does a time come to every man when he can not choose his own good? Could Arjuna not have received the direction from the Divine Who resides in every soul? I find the ‘Guruvada’ as the foundation of Gita to start with.

Answer:
The word ‘Kripana’ comes from the root verb, ’krip’~ and from that comes ‘Karpanya.‘ The ancient meaning of this root is ’to lament’. One who laments is a ’Kripana’~ he is overwhelmed with sorrow, so lamentation is also ’Karpanya.’ That word connotes misery too. The Gita says, ‘Kripana Falahetava‘ (Ch.2, Sl. 49), meaning whoever considers results as the cause or initiator of work, is a ‘kripan’.~ he is lacking in understanding. Grief and illusion torment and eventually completely engulf mind. These two are actions of Rajas and Tamas. As a result, our natural state of understanding gets crippled and can not blossom in its own dignity. This mastery of grief and illusion over our normal self has been termed here as ’Karpanyadosho.’

One who is ready to follow the instructions, is a ’Sishya’, that is, fit to be instructed. Basically, a ’Sishys’ is ’Videheya’~ a follower of discipline. ’ I follow orders without question’, can be done even being unattached. Subservience or surrender is much deeper in nature. Unless one can offer both heart and intellect, absolute Self-Surrender can not be achieved. Not all disciples have surrendered.
Delusion about Dharma is natural for a human being. The reality of Dharma is ‘Hidden in the cave’. It is not easy to understand. That needs prolonged cultivation too. So everybody faces dilemma or delusion regarding Dharma, particularly, when the law of family or race ~ in other words~ the traditional social Dharma rises up against the Eternal Inner Dharma. At that point, only the direction of the Divine within can dispel all doubts and show us what is good and right. But that direction can be understood only with His Grace, only when He kindles the lamp of Intelligence in our hearts. Then there is no difference between Him and I.

The outer instruction is secondary . For people of lesser understanding that might be needed, but not for those with higher Intellect. In the words of Sri Ramakrishna, ’Then as if Someone tells from inside. ‘this follows that~ and that’’

Man is a social being. All of his character and samskara are fruits of his upbringing. Hence, immediately after birth, in whichever way does not matter, but he is under a teacher. Therefore, from one point of view, ’Guruvada’ is a universal truth. But man learns from the outer instructions well as from inner inspiration. The mortal teacher outside and the Divine inside~ both are Gurus. Between them, the Divine inside is closer than the mortal teacher. He is verily the Sadguru. To invoke the Divine within the disciple, to teach the disciple to walk the path with His Light, is the duty of the teacher. Sri Krishna has done the same in Gita. After completing Eighteen Chapters, He has told Arjuna,
‘Whatever I had to say, I have said. Now do whatever you want to do.‘How many Gurus can say that now-a-days?

Question:
What is the mystic interpretation of the 29th sloka of the Second chapter in the Gita? What is the meaning of the word, ‘Ashcharya?’ What is the reason for ~ ‘Not known in sprite of having heard?‘ Does the word ‘Ashcharya’ occur in the Veda? If so, in what connection?

Answer:
The word ‘Ashcharya’ does not occur in the Veda, not even in the ancient Upanishads. It has been used for the first time in the Kathopanishad. This particular sloka of the Gita is from there only. But Panini* has used an expression, ‘Ashcharyamadbhute’. Therefore, the word is an ancient one. In the Vedas the word ’Adbhuta’ meaning, ‘something that never happened before’ has been used in place of ‘Ashcharya’
In the ancient Book of Rasa, two Rasas , according to two different sections of philosophy, are called the original Rasa. One is erotic or Shringar and the other is Adbhuta. In reality Adbhuta is the main Rasa. At the vision of the Supreme Reality human consciousness gets overwhelmed with amazement ~ as if gasping in the depth of the unfathomable ocean of Sacchidananda~ experiencing something that it had never experienced before. This feeling of Beyond is the real feelings of the mystics. Next comes the tremendous attraction towards the Beyond who is ‘Ascharya’ and ‘Adbhuta’. That is the erotic or Shringar Rasa, which too is an original Rasa. In ’Adbhuta’ is the merging of Self and in ’Shringar is the rejoice of Self. So, actually, as you see, the ’Adbhuta’ Rasa is the original one.
To see Him and to hear Him~ ‘Chakshah’ and ‘Shravah‘ of the Veda~ are the Supreme limits of Knowing. Again, it is but natural to develop an urge to express That, Whom we have come to know. Hence this Seeing, Hearing, Understanding and Expressing~ all are expressions of that ‘Adbhuta’ Rasa. After seeing-hearing-knowing Him, when a mystic talks about Him, people hear dumbfounded. But how many do really understand? That is why even the Veda has said, ’Whoever hears, hears in vain’~ man does not understand even after hearing. The fault lies with the impure mind~ and partly with the limitations of language. Surely, the Supreme Mystery can not be expressed in our day-to day language.
________________________________________________________________

The Famous Sanskrit Grammarian of circa 5th or 6th century B.C.

Question:
In the Thirty Ninth sloka of the Second Chapter in the Gita, Sankhya and Karma, both Yogas have been referred to. Which path did the Lord Ask Arjuna to follow to be free from the bondage of Karma?

Answer:
The way of Sankhya is one of Discrimination, and Yoga (Karma) is its applied form. First is discrimination and next is action. Sankhya establishes consciousness on the concept of Non- Dualism, which shows that the whole creation is nothing but a play of the Eternal That. With this thought firmly rooted in the intelligence, doing work without any desire for the results and always having the feeling of a non-doer is Yoga. ’Everything is he.’ Therefore, ’I am working as non-doer’ and ’I am unattached towards the results of the work too’~ a synthesis of these three understandings help cut asunder the knots of Karma. In the field of application, Yoga is more important.

Questions:
Please explain with your interpretation the Forty Fifth Sloka of Chapter 2 of the Gita.

Answer:
By the expression, ’The Veda deals with the Three Gunas’, the Lord has hinted at the narrow dogmatic interpretation of the Veda which aim only at the enjoyment and opulence saying, ‘There is nothing other than that.‘ In this book itself, he has vehemently objected to that saying, ’ That is not the real Veda. Verily do I know what Veda is and I created the Vedanta based on the Veda.‘ The reference to Vedanta aims towards the theory of Purushottama. And the foundation of that is in being beyond the Gunas. Enjoyment and opulence, both are plays of the Gunas. One has to go beyond that~ one has to be established in the Atman. In that condition, mind is as serene as the Akash~ there is no duality of pleasure or pain, gain or loss, victory or defeat~ no desire to acquire anything nor to protect anything. Yet this is not the condition of merging into the Indeterminate Akshara. One has to go beyond Gunas but the earthly life should be based on the Eternal Sat. Eternal Sat or Existence is nothing but the Purified Sat which does not have the disturbances of Rajas or the covering of the Tamas.

It is like the rays of the radiant Knowledge on a clear blue sky. To live with the feeling and work as His instrument for the good of all~ this is the proper following of the Veda or performing Karma which in essence is nothing but Yagna.

The result? To receive His Sadharmya ~ of the One who is beyond Kshara and better than Akshra. He has said that Purushottama has been mentioned in the Veda too (Ch. XV, Sl. 18). Verily, He is the Eternal Existence or in the words of Srimad Bhagavatam~ The Body of Pure Existence.

Question:
TraigunyavishayA VedA nishtraigunya bhavarjuna
Nirdwanda nityasattastha niryogaksema AtmavAn
(Ch.II, Sl. 45)
The Vedas deal with the three Gunas. Oh Arjuna, you be beyond these three gunas. Be above dualities, always established in eternal Sattwa, do not aspire for unattained possessions nor try to hold on to the ones you have. Be your true self.

Please give me the mystic explanation of this sloka. Why have the Vedas being termed as subjected to three gunas or desires? What is the mystery of ‘beyond three gunas’ of Gita? What is the meaning of ‘established in eternal sattwa’? Verily, the Vedas have sections of religious ceremonies as well as of knowledge. As there is ‘Do work here and wish to live for hundred years, so is there the essence of oneness beyond all states of existence and three gunas. The Vedas mention actions with desire. Sri Krishna asked Arjuna to be without desire. But giving up desire does not mean giving up work. Please clear my doubts by bringing to light the deeper meanings of these words.

Answer:
Sri Krishna has put down only those who have no clear judgment and merely engage themselves talking about the doctrines Vedas (Ch. II, sl.42). He is critical about those who say that there is nothing other than the Vedas yet consider the Vedas as nothing but a means to satisfy their desire. Hence He has hit hard the so-called Vedic theory created by the dogmatism of underdeveloped minds. The same way had He dealt a blow to the doctrine of Wisdom by Arjuna at the onset of the battle.

Sri Krishna has criticized only those, who without understanding the wisdom of the Vedas only go for the verbosity and follow dogmatism. Otherwise, He has said elsewhere, ’I am verily the subject of all the Vedas; I have created the Vedantas and am the Knower of the Vedas too (Ch. XV, sl. 15)

This can not be said either that Sri Krishna has supported only the Part of Knowledge of the Vedas and not its Part of Action. He has censured the ‘extravagant rituals of the desirous souls’, yet at the same time added- never give up Yagna, because Yagna purifies the great souls (Ch. XVIII, Sl. 5). He had received a comprehensive idea about Yagna from His guru Ghora Angirasa, learned that the whole life is a Yagna and knowing that Himself became ‘Desireless‘ (Chhandogya Upanishad). He tried to introduce a new movement in the spiritual life, spreading this teaching s of Rishi Ghora, through Gita.

To be without three Gunas( Nishtraigunya) is to be beyond the lower nature. He has explained in details the symptoms of one beyond gunas at the end of the Fourteenth Chapter- both from the aspect of Knowledge as well as from Devotion. The symptoms for a follower in the path of Knowledge is to be completely detached to all activities of illumination, attachment and illusion. This does not happen without attaining the state of Natural Being. There is no reaction of the gunas on the one who has gone beyond the gunas. Now he can play with the gunas because by being beyond he has become the master of the gunas. This is the result of sadhana of the Purusha. Again if we perform our sadhana by being His Prakriti, we will get the same results ( Path of Devotion).

The Sattwa that does not have even a tinge of Rajas or Tamas, is known as ‘Eternal or Purified Sattwa’ This is just in the middle of two conditions- amidst the gunas and beyond gunas.

From the state of Gunatita or beyond Gunas, the Purusha, with the support of the purified sattwa, meaning being in the state of eternal Sattwa or Yoga comes down on this world of Gunas. But in that case the Gunas can not bind him. In mundane condition what was ’Guna’ or tying rope changes to ’Guna’ or innate quality. Because he is beyond gunas, he is attributed with endless virtue. And its expression is in benevolent actions, divine enjoyment and absolute bliss.

This excerpt ise from an upcoming book by Sri Anirvan, translated by Kalyani Bose and published by Morning Light Press. morninglight press.com

Question:
What is the real meaning of, ‘One who knows the Brahman needs all the Vedas as much’ (as the place flooded with water needs smaller ponds) of sloka 46 of Second Chapter? The word ’BrAhmanasya‘ has been attributed to whom?

Answer:
The complete Veda is comprised of the two sections of Jnana( Knowledge) and Karma (Work). The higher Knowledge, (Vijnana) evolves out of study of the section of Knowledge and then a human being really becomes a brAhman,- ‘One who knows the Brahman is a BrAhman‘. For a BrAhman, who has attained this knowledge, ritualistic actions are of no use. The performance of ritualistic actions may be needed for purification of mind, but once the Supreme Knowledge dawns in the mind, there may not be any inclination towards the excessive ritualistic performances, because all work end up in knowledge.

Question:
What is the mystery of ‘Yoga is the skill (Kaushala) for work’ in the sloka No. 50 (Ch. II)? Does the skillful person go beyond good and bad work? ‘Be attached to Yoga’~ what is this Yoga? Has not the Gita used the word Yoga in a very wide and comprehensive sense?

Answer:
The original meaning of the word ‘kushala‘ is one who separates the kusha grass adeptly. Hence ‘kaushala‘ means skill in doing something. The real skill in work lies in the ability to work while established in the Yoga and being established in the Yoga means mastering absolute equality. To live within oneself, not to be disturbed by outward dualities~ these are the symptoms of equality.
Kathopanishad mentions that the speaker and the listener of Spiritual Truth are both ‘kushalas‘. At the root of that are the sense of Wonder and Response to the Higher Intellect. The same has been suggested here too. The ideal of the kushala worker is Sri Krishna~ who has neither anything to do nor anything to obtain, yet is always involved in work. Because of His Supreme Nature, He is beyond good or bad work. The discrimination between good and bad is at the mental plane~ for a non-Yogi. But for the one established in the Yoga, this question does not arise. Of course the word Yoga has been used in a very large and comprehensive sense in the Gita, and the two basic characteristics have been mentioned earlier also. They are to be beyond dualities and to be established in Pure Existence (Nirdwanda and Nityasattwastha).

Question:
Is Shruti confusing( Sl. 53, Ch.II)? Is it needed to give up ‘everything to be heard’ (Shrotavya) in order to attain steadfastness? How does that bring consistency with the saying, ‘The words of Shruti are to be heard?‘

Answer:
In reality, Shruti is not the cause for confusion. But due to the lack of
understanding on the part of the listeners, it is creating confusion too often.

*******************
The following two answers are based on Swami Satyananda’s various intricate questions on the 58th sloka of Second Chapter of the Gita written on two separate letters. The questions are not easy to reproduce and might not be needed for all. But the answers are, as usual like the flow of Bhagirathi, in a class by themselves and will solve many questions in the mind of a sadhaka.
The Sloka goes as follows:

“Yada samharate chAyam kurmoangAniva sarvasah
IndriyAn indriyAthevya sthasya prajnA pratisthitAh”

One, who withholds his senses from their objects everywhere, as a turtle does with its limbs, is firmly established in Wisdom.

Sri Anirvan’s answer: (one)

It is true that Higher Wisdom (Prajna) is established when withdrawal of senses from their objects becomes natural. Yet the Gita propounds Karma. That Karma or action is verily the action of a ‘Sthitaprajna,’ and Sri Krishna is the ideal among the Sthitaprajnas. Time and again, He has said, ’I am Absolute! I am Non-Doer. There is nothing I have to do, nothing I have to obtain, Nor do I not have Everything. Yet I am always in the midst of work.’ By a constant meditation on this thought process of Sri Krishna, one clearly understands the characteristics of a Sthitaprajna. All of us know that action can not be performed without involvement or inclination, which are just the opposite of withdrawal or rejection. Then how does a Sthitaprajna act if he follows the path of rejection? That is the enigma and this is the solution.

Natural withdrawal takes place in sleep, swoon or death. A Yogi withdraws in Samadhi which results in the vision of Reality. That Reality is, in its very nature both Akshara (Indeterminate) and Kshara (Deteminate) aspect of the Supreme.
One who realizes both Kshara and Akshara simultaneously within himself during Samadhi, gets the Purushottama~ who is definitely beyond Kshara (and here he rejects) and yet greater than Akshara. This greatness is at the root of His All-Pervading Self. Then He is the Divine Witness (This is His Akshara Nature), yet at the same time the Sanction Giver, Master, Enjoyer and the Supreme Lord. This permitting, protecting, enjoying and controlling~ all are undoubtedly proof of involvement. But this involvement is not the ignorant involvement of Jiva, but the overflowing of Action from the Eternal Self of Siva. Hence, in Siva, withdrawal and action both are simultaneous, though the force of withdrawal is much stronger. Actually three fourth is Mere Existence, only one fourth is involvement. To be always established in the Self or three fourth withdrawn, therefore being Sthtaprajna, and using only one fourth to be involved in Action and Enjoyment is the Divine
Nature of Siva ~ the natural manifestation of His Shakti. This is the Absolute Condition at the root of Universal Creation.

Jive, on the other hand, is away from this condition. He is unaware of the fact that there is the backdrop of withdrawal behind all involvement. That is why~ to understand the meaning of withdrawal~ he has to behave like a turtle. The initial Sadhana is that of rejection and renunciation.
That is the Yoga of Discipline. The control of senses like the limbs of a turtle is the result of that ~ to examine oneself in and out, whether any tint of desire for either action or enjoyment is lurking anywhere or not.
This is the basic theory of this Yoga. It is like a ship sailing on a voyage of no return. Sri Ramakrishna used to say that the ship does not come back from there. One has to respond to the call of Unknown with the firm conviction of never returning to this petty known world again. This is what has been expounded through this particular sloka of Gita.

But there is an epilogue too. Someone might send you back from there. If you come back, the flow of involvement and inclination will also start afresh. But now, that will not be born of earthly desire. That would rather be a part of the Divine Enjoyment which is at the root of creation. Your will and enjoyment would be nothing but a radiant part of His Will and His Enjoyment. Then you do nothing while doing everything and your enjoyment is not from the worldly objects but from the inner source~ your Self.

Sri Anirvan‘s answer (two)
Prajna (in reference to Sthitaprajna) is a technical term. Prajna appears when Atman dwells within Itself. This is a condition of Samadhi during waking state. It takes time to be established in that. Remember, Samadhi is only a means, not the ultimate state. With the opening of Prajna as a result of Samadhi and an eventual establishment in that ~ which has been termed as ‘Brahmisthiti’ (established in Brahman) at the end of the Chapter~ one can enjoy a steady blissful condition and yet move around in the sense world, having complete control over mind ( Ch. 2, Sloka 68) This is the outer characteristic of Sthitaprajna. The inner characteristics have been described in (Ch.2, Sloka 58) The two previous Slokas (57 &56) throw some light on how this condition can be achieved.
It is something like this. In that condition, there is a complete separation between inner and outer, like a beetle nut within a dried beetle nut, as per Sri Ramakrishna. With normal people, the senses get excited by contact with objects and run outwards ( Ch. 2 , Sloka 60). But with the Sthitaprajna, it is just the opposite. The touch or worldly objects brings about the touch of Brahman and the same senses carry the Brahmic Consciousness to the mind.
The images of worldly objects reflect on consciousness as the moving objects reflecting on a mirror. This is just the secondary goal, a playfulness of the waking moments. The real object is not the fulfillment of deep rooted desires of the mind (Ch.2, Sloka 55), but the attainment of bliss (Ch. 2, sloka 64). When perfected, the contact with sense objects creates a kind of inner flow of enjoyment. Floating on that flow the objects transforms in to subjects, In the words of Sankhya, in the close proximity of Purusha, Prakriti changes as his own Nature. Rabindranath Tagore has drawn a similar picture in his dance drama ‘Natir Puja’ ( worship of a Court Dancer), where the court dancer, in the course of dancing in front of the Stupa of Buddha, sheds off all her apparent fineries and emerges as a nun.
The pulling inward of the limbs of a turtle is not rejection, not even restraint. You can call it, in the words of Upanishad, going inwards. But it is really hard to realize without understanding the Vast as the real goal beyond the apparent touches of sense objects.

 

Question:

Please explain the mystic interpretation of “the attachment towards objects given up, lingers till one ‘sees’ the Higher Being.” ‘Seeing the Higher~ who or what is the Higher? What is the hidden meaning of the expression that the yearn for sense objects does not go away before seeing the Highest Being?

 

Answer:

The one who is ‘controlled’~ meaning who can restrain the natural human inclination to run after sense objects due to practice, develops a sense of detachment in course of time. But this Vairagya ( detachment) does not change to higher Vairagya immediately. The thirst for worldly objects is still hidden in the depth of mind. True, it is checked upto a certain point, does not appear on the surface and the upper mind does not want it and has completely forgotten it. But if ever it appears and takes us unaware, we find mind is enjoying it even without knowing. In that case the thirst for sense objects is still there; the detachment is not yet complete. That is what the Gita is telling here. The thirst for sense objects, that lies deep within, can only be completely ousted if we can once see the Highest Being, Who, according to the Taittiriyo Upanishad, is ‘Verily He is the Rasa (concentration of all enjoyments) and knowing that Rasa, one ‘attains

Ananda.’ According to the Kaushitaki Upanishad, the taste for sense objects is controlled and changes into the ‘taste of Brahman.’ The spontaneous Ananda that ensues without any object is the Ananda of self, or Ananda of Brahman, or Ananda of Truth~ whatever you may call it. Once you get the taste of that, there is no more thirst for sense objects. That is what is meant by restraint of sense objects by ’seeing the Highest.’ This way restraint of senses eventually culminates into an eternal inclination towards the Divine.

 

Question:

What is ‘Prasad’ or ‘Graceful state of mind’ referred to in the 65th sloka of Second Chapter?

 

Answer:

‘Prasad’ is a very old technical term meaning Transparency. In the Ramayana, there is the reference of Godavari (a river) of transparent water. The Upanishads

refer to the realization of Self by the transparency of elements~ elements meaning physical-vital-mental existences. Once they are made transparent, then like light through a prism, the radiance of consciousness glows through body-vital-mind. That is the sign of ‘Prasad’ or Grace.

 

Question:

What is the hidden meaning of,’ a continent keeps awake at night and it is night for the Muni (ascetic) during the waking state of the common people?‘ ( Sloka 69, Chapter 2)

 

Answer:

All creatures are either asleep or shrouded with ignorance regarding Brahman. But a continent is not. He is ever awake in the consciousness of Brahman, whereas the rest of the people are awake with the outer consciousness of the world. As a matter of fact, our culture, our civilization ~everything pertain to the waking field ~ an outer state. Nobody has any inkling regarding what is happening deep down in the mind. But to a Muni, this puffing and blowing of the outer world is like passing of pictures on a screen in a movie theater or like a dream at night. Yet he is ‘seeing‘ in the midst of all that with open eyes. The human ignorance and so-called knowledge~ both are floating on his surface consciousness. Actually his is the eternal consciousness of the Sun beyond the earthly rotation of day and night.

 

Question:

Are ‘Brahmanirvana’ (Nirvana in the Brahman) and ‘Brahnisthiti’ the same? It seems one hints at dissolution and the other at ever lasting existence.

 

Answer:

‘Brahmanirvana is what has been termed in the Upanishad as the realization of Non-Existence or the Great Void or the realization of the Akash. In the path of ascension that appears as dissolution but in reality that is a condition of ever existence or what has been described in the Gita as the ‘Complete Brahma Nirvana of one who knows the Self.’ and Brahmisthti is to stay awake in that Akash like the radiant Sun.

 

Question:

Is this not so that Action based on Sankhya Yoga is really Karma Yoga? Otherwise aimless action can never be termed as Karma Yoga. Is it wise to bring in a sense of lower and higher between Jnana Yoga and Karma Yoga? Is it not right to look at both with equal eyes? What is Karma according to the Upanishads?

 

Answer:

One Supreme Reality is covering everything ( Sloka 17, Chapter 2)~ this is the Knowledge of Sankhya. Towards the end of the Gita, Sri Krishna has said again, ‘One from Whom ensues all activities and efforts of all creatures, One Who is encompassing and covering the whole creation, a man can reach his goal of spiritual perfection by worshipping Him through his work.’ (Sloka 46, Chapter18)

This great sloka gives instruction to work as the worship of the Highest Lord, following the paths of Sankhya, Shalti and Bhakti. This is the real Karma yoga and the essence of Gita’s teachings,

Whatever Knowledge is attained by Sankhya, the Karma Yoga results in the same. Hence, to have the same devotion towards both has been expounded by Gita (Sloka 4-5, Chapter 5). The Upanishad too, has never asked to give up action. Rather mentioned about working and living up to hundred years. Furthermore, Upanishad has said that action with detachment does not involve anyone.

 

Question;

Does the speaker of Gita put too much importance on Sannyasa (renunciation)?

 

Answer:

No.

 

This is the end of Q/A on Chapter 2 (Sankhya Yoga) in the Gitanuvachan

 

Question:

Please explain the mystic interpretation of “the attachment towards objects given up, lingers till one ‘sees’ the Higher Being.” ‘Seeing the Higher~ who or what is the Higher? What is the hidden meaning of the expression that the yearn for sense objects does not go away before seeing the Highest Being?

 

Answer:

The one who is ‘controlled’~ meaning who can restrain the natural human inclination to run after sense objects due to practice, develops a sense of detachment in course of time. But this Vairagya ( detachment) does not change to higher Vairagya immediately. The thirst for worldly objects is still hidden in the depth of mind. True, it is checked upto a certain point, does not appear on the surface and the upper mind does not want it and has completely forgotten it. But if ever it appears and takes us unaware, we find mind is enjoying it even without knowing. In that case the thirst for sense objects is still there; the detachment is not yet complete. That is what the Gita is telling here. The thirst for sense objects, that lies deep within, can only be completely ousted if we can once see the Highest Being, Who, according to the Taittiriyo Upanishad, is ‘Verily He is the Rasa (concentration of all enjoyments) and knowing that Rasa, one ‘attains

 

Ananda.’ According to the Kaushitaki Upanishad, the taste for sense objects is controlled and changes into the ‘taste of Brahman.’ The spontaneous Ananda that ensues without any object is the Ananda of self, or Ananda of Brahman, or Ananda of Truth~ whatever you may call it. Once you get the taste of that, there is no more thirst for sense objects. That is what is meant by restraint of sense objects by ’seeing the Highest.’ This way restraint of senses eventually culminates into an eternal inclination towards the Divine.

 

Question:

What is ‘Prasad’ or ‘Graceful state of mind’ referred to in the 65th sloka of Second Chapter?

 

Answer:

‘Prasad’ is a very old technical term meaning Transparency. In the Ramayana, there is the reference of Godavari (a river) of transparent water. The Upanishads

refer to the realization of Self by the transparency of elements~ elements meaning physical-vital-mental existences. Once they are made transparent, then like light through a prism, the radiance of consciousness glows through body-vital-mind. That is the sign of ‘Prasad’ or Grace.

 

 Question:

What is the hidden meaning of,’ a continent keeps awake at night and it is night for the Muni (ascetic) during the waking state of the common people?‘ ( Sloka 69, Chapter 2)

 

Answer:

All creatures are either asleep or shrouded with ignorance regarding Brahman. But a continent is not. He is ever awake in the consciousness of Brahman, whereas the rest of the people are awake with the outer consciousness of the world. As a matter of fact, our culture, our civilization ~everything pertain to the waking field ~ an outer state. Nobody has any inkling regarding what is happening deep down in the mind. But to a Muni, this puffing and blowing of the outer world is like passing of pictures on a screen in a movie theater or like a dream at night. Yet he is ‘seeing‘ in the midst of all that with open eyes. The human ignorance and so-called knowledge~ both are floating on his surface consciousness. Actually his is the eternal consciousness of the Sun beyond the earthly rotation of day and night.

 

Question:

Are ‘Brahmanirvana’ (Nirvana in the Brahman) and ‘Brahnisthiti’ the same? It seems one hints at dissolution and the other at ever lasting existence.

 

Answer:

 ‘Brahmanirvana is what has been termed in the Upanishad as the realization of Non-Existence or the Great Void or the realization of the Akash. In the path of ascension that appears as dissolution but in reality that is a condition of ever existence or what has been described in the Gita as the ‘Complete Brahma Nirvana of one who knows the Self.’ and Brahmisthti is to stay awake in that Akash like the radiant Sun.

 

Question:

Is this not so that Action based on Sankhya Yoga is really Karma Yoga? Otherwise aimless action can never be termed as Karma Yoga. Is it wise to bring in a sense of lower and higher between Jnana Yoga and Karma Yoga? Is it not right to look at both with equal eyes? What is Karma according to the Upanishads?

 

Answer:

One Supreme Reality is covering everything ( Sloka 17, Chapter 2)~ this is the Knowledge of Sankhya. Towards the end of the Gita, Sri Krishna has said again, ‘One from Whom ensues all activities and efforts of all creatures, One Who is encompassing and covering the whole creation, a man can reach his goal of spiritual perfection by worshipping Him through his work.’ (Sloka 46, Chapter18)

 

This great sloka gives instruction to work as the worship of the Highest Lord, following the paths of Sankhya, Shalti and Bhakti. This is the real Karma yoga and the essence of Gita’s teachings,

 

Whatever Knowledge is attained by Sankhya, the Karma Yoga results in the same. Hence, to have the same devotion towards both has been expounded by Gita (Sloka 4-5, Chapter 5). The Upanishad too, has never asked to give up action. Rather mentioned about working and living up to hundred years. Furthermore, Upanishad has said that action with detachment does not involve anyone.

 

Question;

Does the speaker of Gita put too much importance on Sannyasa (renunciation)?

 

 Answer:

No.

 

This is the end of Q/A on Chapter 2 (Sankhya Yoga) in the Gitanuvachan

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Mahapralaya

Comment: Mahapralaya- A history to remember and the revolutionary Jatindranath Mukherjee had a great role in his time. Quite India was more violent than non-violent. British left under compelling circumstances- the time was ripe- they could not stay on more so they left doing utmost damage to the country's integrity and some of the then leaders helped them. Subhas Chandra Bose's actions had great effect in pushing the British to vacate.Aju MukhopadhyaySee More
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Anuloma Viloma practice with Dr. Nalini Sahay - part 1 and 2

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The Last Bargain, by Rabindranath Tagore

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Gurudev's poem Prantik 2

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Sri Anirvan : Written Book

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RABINDRA SANGEET, AND INTERESTING VIDEOS RELATING TO INDIA'S HISTORY

;

;

RABINDRA SANGEET - JE RAATE MOR DUAAR GULI

RABINDRA SANGEET

-Je Raate Mor Duaar Guli
This song gives the extraordinary feeling of the capacity of Sri Anirvan to arrive at the very moment of emergency when he was needed. How he just appeared there, was a miracle.
http://www.esnips.com/doc/d68409ad-a62e-4c4d-ae57-9083ffda7336/Ashoktaru---Je-Raate-Mor-Duarguli

That night when my doors were smashed by the storm, I did not know it was you who had entered my house. All around everything went black, the wick of the lamp was extinguished.
I stretched out my arms to reach the sky, towards hope..
I did not know it was you who had entered my house,
That night when my doors were smashed by the storm.
I lay there sobbing, thinking it all a dream,
How could I know that the storm was a pennant of your triumph?
Morning dawned, and I beheld you,
A fountain of tears, you, yourself.
The whole house, save for ourselves, was and had been empty.
I did not know it was you who had entered my house,
That night when my doors were smashed by the storm.

AAJI JHORER RAATE TOMAR ABHISHAR sung by KALIM SARAFI


AAJI JHORER RAATE TOMAR ABHISHAR

Sung by Srikant Acharya, intro by Soumitra Chatterjee

http://www.esnips.com/doc/71cd2d88-32e1-45e2-84b6-17b37de0308c/Apan-Gaan-2---04---Saumitra-Chattopadhyay--Srikanta-Acharya---Aaji-Jhorer-Raate-Tomar

Sung by the famous singer Pankaj Mullick of the 1940s.
http://www.esnips.com/doc/fb86d1e1-81db-4223-8f23-186f36793dfb/001.-aaji-jharher-raate_Pankaj-Kumar-Mallik
Art thou abroad on this stormy night
On thy journey of love, my friend?
The sky groans like one in despair.
I have no sleep tonight.
Ever and again I open my door and look out on the darkness, my friend!
I can see nothing before me.
I wonder where lies thy path!
By what dim shore of the ink-black river,
By what far edge of the frowning forest,
Through what mazy depth of gloom art thou threading thy course to come to me, my friend?

**************************

GANDHIJI'S FAVOURITE -

http://www.esnips.com/doc/baefd96c-e4f8-4fb5-912d-d0d2b65ea479/Rabindra-Sangeet--Jodi-tor-dak-suney-keu-na-aashe-tobe
SUNG BY SRABONI SEN

http://youtu.be/5MYDX77cyw4

Sraboni Sen - Tai Tomar Anondo Amar Por -

http://youtu.be/RwPODzUtsHE

INDRANI SEN - Je Raate Mor Duar Guli - http://youtu.be/JTmOIYIhZaw

RITA GANGULY - http://youtu.be/y5NOBFbAFR4

http://youtu.be/6-HpjpeoB38

AND http://youtu.be/CAYnCWCu6yE

ALSO http://youtu.be/Inemer1Vscc

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13.GAYATRI MANDALA 6

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ENGLISH TRANSLATIONS

1.GITANUVACHAN translated into english by SMT KALYANI BOSE

http://www.flipsnack.com/958C5758B7A/fdt8o989

2.PATHER SATHI VOL 1

translated into english by SMT KALYANI BOSE

http://www.flipsnack.com/958C5758B7A/ft3wu0w0

3.MANDUKYA UPANISHAD English Translation

http://www.flipsnack.com/958C5758B7A/fd1pyhnh

4. MEETING PRTHWINDRA MUKHERJEE

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**********************************

NOTEWORTHY COMMENTS BY MEMBERS OF ANIRVAN AKASH

BY SHARAT KUMAR BHUSHAN

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Right now busy in addressing J Krishnamurti's followers in India and abroad.Struggling to finish book on Adwait,Raman,Nisargadatt Maharaj,Jk

BY AJU MUKHOPADHYAY

, aju mukhopadhyay

- "I am thinking how so to fix the attention so it can be unwavering- never turns aside- Oh! What great a job-"

My interest in Sri Anirvan continues with greater intensity these days. I have read almost all the valuable translations of his writings appearing in the blogs.

Unfortunately I do not know any Bengali although ambitiously I got many of his writings from the Dharampal's when I met them some years ago.

BY VIKRAMAN BALAJI

request: it seems Sri Aniravan used to give regular talks on Sri Aurobindo's Savitri in the Pathmandir. It would be a great service if someone could translate these talks since Anirvan's insight would help clarify many aspects of Savitri.

Thanks again and best regards

Balaji

BY SHARAT KUMAR BHUSHAN

Sharat Kumar Bhushan Di' I do not know why these lines by Hammarskjold are coming to my mind after reading your comment.

"Night!The road stretches ahead.Behind me it winds up in curves towards the house,a gleam in the darkness under the dense trees of the park.I know that,shrouded in the dark out there,people are moving,that all around me,hidden by the night,life is a quiver.I know that something is waiting for me in the house.Out of the darkness of the park comes the call of solitary bird:and I go-up there

BY SUBHASHISH BORAH

subhashish borah

- We should be proud of what we are, and we should not be dejected at what we are not as we desire. We should be proud of what we are not that we didn't wish for.

But the horror is that we are starting to be proud of what we are not that we desire to be!

The philosophy is that if you are X, be proud of being X, and don't be dejected because you are not the most fortunate one of the world you may have a dormant desire to be so. And be proud for you are not the most unfortunate person in the world and you didn't, don't and will never desire to be so.

But don't be proud of your vain self-images, just be proud of what you are and realize it with optimum firmness. There is a difference between "Will" and "hope". Suppose you want to be something or somebody in this life time. You cannot become that, if you are not at this very moment not that something or somebody you want to realize.This should be dormant within you waiting just for expression or manifestation. When proper time, environment and other supportive factors will be available to you, and if you have the necessary will to be so, you will one day appear as such.

Let's be our realities, not our imaginations! Let's be free from our inner insecurities! And here I intentionally use the word to be 'proud' in place of simply to 'accept' oneself, because the fact of 'Will' cannot properly manifest through a meek humbleness or moral humility.."

BY GURUCHARAN OJHA

Gurucharan Ojha

- Accept my hearty greet "Jayaguru". I am from Odisha, Devotee of Swami Nigamananda Saraswati. I read little more before Swami Nirbana nanda Saraswati "Anirbana".

I just need to know about his life details.....

BY SUBHASHISH BORAH

subhashish borah - "It is the "sense of wonder" that as 21st century's "homo-fabers" or "homo-technicus" evolving(I doubt!?) far out of our real natures of "homo-sapience" we have lost and we have forgotten to be astonished at things beautiful and as well as horrific!! We have been oblivious of feeling strange at anything...

This sense of wonder I believe is the real essnce of all creativity not only poetry or other art forms but science, mathematics , physics, chemistry, biology etc everything...

It impels us to discover things"

BY ANIRBAN

Anirban NAMASTE,

"To all the members in this GROUP"

It's really a pleasure and an honour for me to be a part of this group.

SRI ANIRVAN - THOU ART THE RULER OF THE humble mind of mine. CANST THOU RULE mine DESTINY, TOO?

My most humble PRONAAMS to GOURI-MASHIMA and GAUTAM-MESHOMASHAI.

I DO PRAY TO THE LORD OF ALL LORDS FOR QUICK RECOVERY OF GOURI-MASHIMA.

OH LORD, I think I am pretty LOUD and CLEAR.

ANIRBAN-AKASH - Is it a confirmation that our desires/DESIRE are(IS) fulfilled?

For though our desires may yet be fulfilled in this very human birth, do we really crave for our DESIRE to be satiated? If so, how do we enjoy THE ETERNAL LILA?

May we be firmly grounded whilst we touch THE AKASH (The SKY).

Best regards,

Anirban

BY SMT KALYANI BOSE

Kalyani Bose Dear Anirban,

I was not being able to come to the site for a very long time. Just today I opened it up to see your page and am inpressed. Are you or do you know Bengali? Of course you are because you have read His books. Your question about enjoying the ETERNAL LILA has evoked in my mind an expression form Sri Chaitanya Mahapravu. The Eternal Lila is like 'Tapta Ikshu Charvan' - Again 'Mukh Jwale NA JAi Tyajan-

Prosanti O prasannataye Ujjal Theko.

May the Grace of Sri Anirvan bring in us the Yuganaddha Dyavaprithivi.

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